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SOUTH CENTRAL KENTUCKY COUNCIL OF THE BLIND

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Serving the blind and low vision population of South Central Kentucky

Home Page of the SCKCB

Louis kickin' back and chillin'
Every organization needs a mascot. Ours is a blind teddy bear named Louis in honor of Louis Braille and made by Sue Robinson, who makes cute teddy bears and other beautiful artistic items.
Painting of Louis Braille click for bio
Louis Braille was born in France in 1809 and blinded at age 3 by an accident. He invented the braille system of writing between the ages of 12 and 15. He is our Mascot's namesake.

Our Next Business Meeting

The SCKCB will have our regular bi-monthly meeting on Sunday, February 4th at 1:30 PM. The meeting will be held at the Neighborhood & Community Services Building, located at 707 E. Main Ave., Bowling Green. Just follow East Main to the top of what is commonly referred to as "Hospital Hill." There is a large parking lot on the left side of the building below the street level. The entrance to our meeting room is accessible from this lower parking lot level. Check out our meetings page for specific driving directions and Google Maps routing from your location.

This will be our first business meeting for for 2018, and the first one in quite a while, as our October meeting was the fall picnic and December's meeting will be the Christmas party both being non-business meetings.

Christmas Party

Our annual Christmas party is scheduled for the first Sunday of December, the 3rd, at the Neighborhood & Community Services Building where we hold our regular meetings. See the Programs and Activities page for more information.

Senators Markey and Capito Introduce Legislation to Improve Educational Opportunities for Visual and Hearing-Impaired Students

Washington (November 7, 2017)

Senator Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) and Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.V.) today introduced bipartisan legislation that would strengthen the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to ensure that visual and hearing-impaired students receive the best possible education. The Alice Cogswell and Anne Sullivan Macy Act will improve the effectiveness and personalization of education and services for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, visually impaired, and deaf-blind. The legislation would improve reporting and evaluation measures of special education in each state, increase training for teachers and other special education professionals, and reaffirm the Department of Education's mission and responsibility to ensure an accessible and quality education for all students.

This bill is named after Alice Cogswell, the first deaf student to be formally educated in the United States, and Anne Sullivan Macy, Helen Keller's famous teacher. Congressman Matt Cartwright (PA-17) and Congressman David McKinley (WV-1) introduced companion legislation in the House of Representatives earlier this year.

More than one hundred years after Anne Sullivan Macy worked with Hellen Keller at Massachusetts’s Perkins School, we are coming together to ensure that students in the 21st century receive the best education, said Senator Markey. I am happy to introduce this legislation with Senator Capito to help deaf, blind, and deaf-blind students across the country by improving access to quality education and offering them the chance to work with effective educators and trained professionals. Every student should have the opportunity to maximize their God-given abilities, and our bill will help thousands of students do just that.

It is essential students in West Virginia and across the nation who are deaf, hard of hearing or have vision loss receive the specialized services they need to reach their fullest potential, said Senator Capito. The Cogswell-Macy Act would help ensure the educational needs of these students are better met.

A copy of the legislation can be found HERE.

Specifically, the Cogswell-Macy Act would:

Since 1975, the law has worked wonders in terms of ensuring the right of every student with a disability to be included in our public education system, said Mark Richert, Policy Director for the American Foundation for the Blind. But what we've never done is to make sure that students, particularly kiddos who are blind, visually impaired, deaf, hard of hearing, or deafblind, get what they need once they get in the schoolhouse door. With Senate introduction of the Cogswell-Macy Act, we're signaling to everyone that we're not prepared to wait for the needs of another generation of students with sensory disabilities to be ignored before we work with our amazing champions on the Hill to change things.

This bill acknowledges and supports the various ways that deaf and hard of hearing children learn. There is no 'one size fits all' under IDEA, and the Cogswell-Macy Act will provide guidance to states as to how to tailor individualized education to these students, particularly in the areas of language and communication, said Sandra Edwards, President of the Conference of Educational Administrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf (CEASD) and Superintendent of the Mississippi School for the Deaf.

We are thrilled that the Cogswell-Macy Act will be introduced in the Senate and thank Senator Markey for his leadership and passion, said Dave Power, President and CEO of Perkins School for the Blind. Perkins has been a fierce advocate in ensuring that blind, visually-impaired, and deafblind students have access to the highest quality services here in Massachusetts and nationally. Their ability to fulfill their unique potential requires the strongest possible IDEA and our ongoing commitment to seeing its execution.

When it becomes the law of the land, the Cogswell-Macy Act will empower students who are deafblind to succeed in the 21st century American classroom, said Mussie Gebre, President of DeafBlind Citizens in Action (DBCA). As deafblind people speaking for ourselves, we in DBCA know from personal experience how providing interveners, qualified teachers, and the whole range of instructional services and supports today will make it possible tomorrow for society to fully benefit from the brain power and drive that our community has to offer.

SCKCB Mailing List

The main communication between the SCKCB members is our SCKCB mailing list. As many of you may know, we have been experiencing a few minor problems with the list over the past year. We have resolved most of the issues with the mailing list, though it appears we still have an issue with our Vice President's postings being bounced. We continue work to resolve these and any new issues that may arise.

Recently, a spam post unfortunately got through to the list, as many of you know. The server flags posts to the list that it thinks might be questionable for our review before getting posted to the list, as it did for this post. The addresses associated with the post were good enough that it fooled us into thinking that it was from a member though it was not. As we do not censor messages from our members we didn't look at it's content until it was too late. The good news is that after checking out the post it appears that it was just that -- spam, not malware/virus infected. However, We appologize for this message getting through at all. We have blocked all posts coming from the server that originated this message and we will redouble our efforts to make sure that this type of post doesn't get through to our list again in the future. The blocking of the server involved will not affect any of our member's ability to post messages.

If you experience any problems with the mailing list, or wish to join the list, please contact our webmaster. Please note that while we do not censor our members' posts, non-SCKCB members' posts will be held until approved by the list managers. This is to ensure that spam and/or malware posts do not make it through to our members.

Our Mission Statement

The South Central Kentucky Council of the Blind (SCKCB), our parent organization, the American Council of the Blind, and its affiliates, strive to increase the independence, security, equality of opportunity and quality of life for all blind and visually impaired people.

For more information about the South Central Kentucky Council of the Blind or to join our organization, see our About Us page.